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Christy Williams Richards

Christy Williams Richards is a four-time Canadian Women's Trials Champion and eleven-time American NATC Women's Trials Champion, and has also competed at the International level. Christy was recently named trials team manager of the Sherco FactoryOne Mototrials team for 2020! She tells us what it was like growing up in the sport, being one of the few females in trials and getting more women involved.

Follow Christy on Facebook and Instagram!

PJ Doran:
Welcome to Pit Pass Moto, the show that keeps you up to speed on the latest in motorcycling and brings the biggest names in motorcycle racing right to you. I'm PJ Doran.

Dave Sulecki:
I'm Dave Sulecki.

PJ Doran:
This week we have 11 time American NATC Women's Trial Champion, Christy Williams, and we're looking forward to talking to her. But first, we wanted to open the show with a little bit of news from the road racing world. Again, it's thin days for content in the road racing world. But there was a MotoGP test, a meaningful one, in Sepang, in Malaysia, and on the end of the weekend we had some surprise results. I will tell you the top 20 finishers after three days of combined results inside of one second. That's 20 human beings on a roughly two minute race track all within one second of one another.

PJ Doran:
Top finisher on the combined results, Fabio Quartararo on a non-factory Yamaha, which is a good sign for him. His satellite team is going to be very happy. Cal Crutchlow, the raging Brit, came flying in on his Honda. Then of course, Álex Rins, the superstar Suzuki team rider, factory rider. Notable other finishers, Valentino Rossi in a very respectable 5th place. He was the fastest factory Yamaha with again, Fabio, well ahead of him in 1st. His teammate Maverick Viñales, a bit further back in 16th place, but still well inside of roughly a half second back. The Honda teammates, the brothers, Álex and Marc Márquez, Álex being the rookie to the class finished overall 18th only seven tenths off of Quartararo up front. His brother Marc, multiple world champion, reigning world champion only four tenths off the leader but in 13th place. So, an interesting start to be not yet quite our road racing season. And let's now talk about, with those results, Supercross Dave.

Dave Sulecki:
Yeah, for sure. This weekend, man, San Diego, another great round of Supercross racing. Had a 450 Class just jumping the reigning champ, Cooper Webb comes out of nowhere, pressures CNC Amarillo and do a couple of bobbles there and pulls off the win.

PJ Doran:
Yeah, that was an impressive battle. They had [inaudible 00:02:39] in the main tried to answer back. He didn't just give it away. But ultimately Cooper Webb put a little gap on everybody, right?

Dave Sulecki:
Yeah, for sure. And you know, he's solidly 3rd in the points, which at this point in the season, you really got to keep an eye on the guy and he's defending champs. So you know, he knows how to win. He's a solid rider, he's got solid results and you know, Tomac had a rough night. Had a Tomac like start. Started out about 10th on the start of the race and worked his way up to 4th. So unlike Tomac, it didn't get inside his head and derail his night. So he's still in and he's in a solid 2nd points. He actually picked up points on Roxon.

PJ Doran:
Everybody in the top five who isn't Ken Roxon picked up points on the points' leader, Ken Roxon, including Tomac. He's now only one back as I understand.

Dave Sulecki:
Yeah, he is exactly 129 points to 130 surprise of the night to me though was Blake Baggett the guy, holeshots and just looks solid. He is sneaky. [inaudible 00:03:40] , man. He could just, he really did it well.

PJ Doran:
Absolutely. He looked great and he faced, and faced down a very stiff competition from behind. Tomac never made ground on him. He made some great passes. Yeah, he looked really strong. And in the 250 Class, how about our a reigning champ, making a statement there too.

Dave Sulecki:
Yeah, he's a stud. I tell ya. Aggressive, didn't give in to anybody. Made some really, I wouldn't say dirty passes, but very, very aggressive passes. And he's under the microscope cause he's on probation and just looks solid. Fran is the guy he worked on Forkner well, and Forkner even admitted after the race, "Man, this can't keep happening to me that late in the race and losing the lead". But Fran, this is a forest man. He's just solid.

PJ Doran:
Absolutely. And as you said on the evening for Francis wins over Forkner, Justin Cooper, respectable 3rd place. They're pretty tight in points in that Class as well. Francis got a little gap on them though.

Dave Sulecki:
Yeah. It's a 135 for Francis down to 128 for Cooper. So it's a tight spread. So here's the thing that came into play in the 250 Class, which I haven't seen all season is Lappers. I think you might've heard Forkner talk about it after the race. That was the first Supercross this year where I really saw them possibly affect the outcome. It might've slowed Forkner down enough that Francis got up there and was able to put the past. But up until then I had put Lappers are always a problem, right? But.

PJ Doran:
Absolutely.

Dave Sulecki:
Yeah. But this particular race, I think it may have had an effect on the outcome. We'll just keep an eye on that. I mean, the track was fast in one line, which doesn't help things. Probably exacerbated the Lapar problem.

PJ Doran:
Absolutely. And the same happened arguably in the 450 I don't think it affected the outcome, but Tomac was clearly a little chapped with Barcia afterwards. And [crosstalk 00:05:44] if you are watching the stopwatch, they both lost a significant amount of time in the moments of their battle with one another. They dropped three or four seconds, arguably just battling each other. They essentially put it in park in a couple of times.

Dave Sulecki:
Yeah, they did. They slowed each other down and that's what happens. So, so back to the 450s real quickly, I got one point to make. There's an interesting stat that I heard over the weekend. That no rider starting his 7th season, having not won the Supercross championship has never won the title. Well The two guys leading the points in the 450 Class are starting their 7th season this year. So, it's going to be interesting.

PJ Doran:
And one of them is going to get that dubious honor of being the guy who did not win the title. One of them hopefully, you know it, could still be anybody's game, but those two front runners, again, assuming they don't do anything tragic. Our odds on, I would say.

Dave Sulecki:
So, your money's still on Tomac?

PJ Doran:
I think he's [inaudible 00:00:06:47]. I mean, it's you can't discount Roxon and he's got there even on wins for the season. They're clearly essentially even on points. They're both seasoned Veterans. You can't count out, obviously, the guy who won on the night and reminded everyone why is the defending title champion. There's four guys, five guys at the front. I mean all the way back to Anderson, the poor guy. We didn't say his name because just can't catch a break.

Dave Sulecki:
No, he's having a tough year.

PJ Doran:
He's having a tough year and it's not always his fault, but it nonetheless, it adds up to dang-it he can't catch a break.

Dave Sulecki:
Yeah, I agree. I agree. So as they head back East finally, so folks like you and I won't have to stay up as late to watch the race.

PJ Doran:
Looking forward to that.

Dave Sulecki:
Yeah, I'm looking forward to that too. Those late nights are killing me, but you know it's, it's going to be exciting, and I'm going to stick my neck out. I'm going to say Tomac wins it this year. He's my guy. He's always been my guy. I really to hope I don't jinx him saying that, but I think as we go East, those are more his kind of track. He's got a different mindset this year. He looks more solid. The mistakes aren't affecting them negatively like they have in the past. So he's, I'm going to go with them. I think we're seven rounds in now. We can say that.

PJ Doran:
Right on. Well I'm with ya. That is, it's going to be a great season. Still, just can't wait every week is a blast to watch and now we get to watch the East coast, 250 guys. So I'm looking forward to that as well.

Music:
[inaudible]

Dave Sulecki:
Pit Pass Moto trivia question of the week is, "What year was the present day motorcycle control layout made standard"?

PJ Doran:
We'll be right back with our guest, Kristy Williams, professional trials rider and now team captain manager. Thank you for joining us on Pit Pass.

Music:
[inaudible]

Dave Sulecki:
Welcome, Kristy Williams to Pit Pass. Thank you for joining us. Christy, our guest has been recently named the Sherco FactoryONE Moto trials team manager for 2020 on top of that illustrious title, she has a mountain of personal triumphs that we're going to let her tell us all about. Welcome to the show, Christy.

Christy Williams Richards:
Thank you for having me.

Dave Sulecki:
It's our pleasure. So let's talk about your new role. First of all, Sherco, a brand that anyone in any facet of motorcycle racing is probably familiar with. They are one of the smaller players but seem to be fast on the rise and clearly they're bringing in talented individuals such as yourself. How'd you get involved with Sherco?

Christy Williams Richards:
I've been in the trials' industry for years and then Sherco started off with a trials bike. They didn't introduce the Enduro bike for quite a few years, and so now we're known in all the disciplines. But yeah, I met with the owner of the FactoryONE team at a project that he has called Super Trial, which is basically like an x trail. So it's an indoor style stadium trial and I was helping him organize that and I do the announcing for it, and then we got along really great, and we started talking about what his vision was for his trials team and then we went from there.

PJ Doran:
So Christy, I have to believe, and correct me if I'm wrong, clearly you are a talented rider. We can take, we're completely out of the equation. You are an uber talented rider. Are you the first woman in this type of role within the trials world?

Christy Williams Richards:
Yes. I would say that I'm the first woman in this type of role, but this type of role hasn't really existed for that long. So trials has always been a bit of a backyard sport where we tend to exist a little bit below the radar. Everybody's kind of heard of trials or maybe seen it on a YouTube video, but not a ton of real media footage. So we've had really small teams that haven't really necessitated a manager. And now, especially with this big push from FactoryONE motor sports, we're looking at becoming a bigger team and trying to help trials become a bigger sport. More along the lines of not necessarily a Supercross, that might be a little bit of a overreach, but in that general direction where we're going to have teams with more riders on them, teams with more sponsors, teams with more media coverage. So yes, I'm the first woman in a job like this, but it's very rare. This wasn't an opportunity five years ago, so it's pretty awesome.

Dave Sulecki:
It is exciting to see a manufacturer invest heavily in the U.S. in the trials market. We know in Europe that trials is very big and Asia too really. And it's a disservice cause it's really one of the most elegant, entertaining, challenging forms of motorcycling out there. So what do they have planned for this year in addition to you managing the team and the nuts and bolts of schedules and getting riders and bikes and parts what do they have planned to promote the series more than they have in the past?

Christy Williams Richards:
So for us, we are traveling with one of the biggest teams. I've got 15 riders on my team from our top pro riders, we've got Pat Maggi, he's 11 times U.S. National Champion, and that's unheard of, we've never had anybody win 11. And then I've got a past U.S. National Women's Champion, Louis Forgery as one of our top lady riders. And then I've got some kids who are young as 12, which is also really cool that we're starting the programs earlier. We're not just going after all of the pros who are kind of already able to get sponsors on their own. We're trying to get some grassroots riders up and into the program. So we're going to all the U.S. National events. We're going to be at all the Super Trial events. We're going to be at the AMA Youth National, which a lot of the manufacturers struggle to get to.

Christy Williams Richards:
There's not a ton of money right now kicking around in trials. Like I said, it's very grassroots, Mom and Pop kind of scenario. So I'm not hitting on the other manufacturers, but it's just, it's impossible. The country's massive, and it's so hard to be in California one weekend and then the next weekend you got to go all the way to the crowds training center in Tennessee. And it's just, it's such a crazy demand. So I'm really proud that we're able to kind of overcome those logistical details. And then we also have the financial backing to make it a reality. So we're going to all the events and when we're there we're going to be supporting all of our riders. But then we also travel with a trailer full of parts. So if you have any kind of recent within the last six or so years of a Sherco, we should have parts for you. So we want to get as many Sherco's up and running and finishing events, and doing as best they can to represent the brand.

PJ Doran:
And I'm familiar, Christy, with other manufacturers doing region B at regional or local races and then combining with that essentially test ride events. Are you able to do, or are you doing that kind of thing? You know all a KTM shows up at off road races and they bring a trailer full of bikes to certain events and you sign up. Yamaha does the same thing and maybe you get to try out some of the machines. Is that something you guys engage in at all during the course of the season or no?

Christy Williams Richards:
Not so much for the trials bikes. For the Enduro bikes, I do know that we have a lot of demo days that we're planning because the Enduro bikes are fairly new on the U.S. market where the importer-ship with RYP is just fresh for midway through 2019 because you know the bikes come in a bit early. The Sherco Enduro's are going to be at different events, and having demo days and stuff like that. The trials bikes which have been around for a little bit longer, not necessarily. However, getting in touch with your local dealers, because it's such a grassroots Mom and Pop thing, if you phone up any trials' dealer, and this is blanket statement of any manufacturer or whatever. If you see somebody with a trials bike and you say, "Hey, that's a cool bike. Can I talk to you about trials?", or "Can I try your bike?". Hands down they'll say yes every single time. It's like, "Do you ride trials?", "Did we just become best friends?", "Yep.". The next thing you know you're hooked.

Dave Sulecki:
You're absolutely right. I've met many trials riders over the years and that exactly "here ride my bike" and here's the funny thing, Christy, is you think you'd know how to ride, get on a trials bike and you'll find out you don't know how to ride.

Christy Williams Richards:
I'm just coming off my job previous to this I was working at a motocross track as an instructor and I taught trials, lessons, but then I also did hard Enduro a little bit as all trials riders when they retire from trials go and they do some harder Enduro. So I was doing lessons there and I ended up, the trials lessons were super popular. I was getting the motorcrossers coming and they're like, "We want to try this. We've seen it, it looks so cool." And just within the first hour, just basically begging for mercy, "How do you do this? Going slow is so hard."

Dave Sulecki:
It is.

Christy Williams Richards:
But coming away from it with a lot of valuable skills that would transfer over onto their motocross bikes with their Enduro bikes.

Dave Sulecki:
Couldn't agree with you more. I've actually, I can remember in the past that was used as a cross training platform for motocross or even off road. I mean, the skills you learn and trials transfer over 100% agree. It's so challenging to do.

Christy Williams Richards:
I think. Yeah, I think a lot of people see it for transferring over to Enduro and hard Enduro and things like that. The motocrossers don't always see it right away because it is such a little sport. But the biggest comment that I got from the motocross riders was that their clutch work improved in their corners. Their corners became much faster because their clutch work improved by so much. It's across all disciplines and I don't know that motocross riders see it as much, but it's there. It's such a great way, especially if that's your first way that you started riding motorcycles. You know?

Dave Sulecki:
Sure. For sure. And I think for a lot of motocrossers, their first reaction to an obstacle is more throttle. And a lot of times on a trials bike, it's the complete opposite. You know, you need to think backwards almost. Or it's just they're hard wired differently, I guess.

Christy Williams Richards:
It's a lot of planning and that again, so clutch work is a huge thing. And then the other thing is that, because like you said, we work backwards, we're always scouting hadn't, and picking our line, and I think that transfers over into other disciplines. So in a hard Enduro we may be a little bit slower as we approach an obstacle because we're taking the time to pick the line and work backwards. But because we've picked the right line we'll scoot through something fairly easily, we'll save some time there, we'll save some physical energy, and then we'll be on our way faster. So it's a benefit and that'll help in a motorcross quarter too. Coming in and being able to pick your line and pick your rut and know where you're going to go and stick to it. That transfers over also.

PJ Doran:
So that brings up the point, your involvement, you said you've got some women on your team. Are you seeing more women get into this sport, or is it always held the same interest for the women that you've encountered while being in the sport? Cause you've been in this sport for quite some time. It's worth noting, I presume from a fairly young age, you were very involved in the trials competitions.

Christy Williams Richards:
Yeah, it's a family sport for me. So this is what I grew up with. My first bike was the TY80 and that's how I learned how to ride. And then I didn't really do much with it. I was a very Sunday funday kind of casual rider until they made a woman's class in 1998 in the U.S. Nationals. So I got to see some other ladies compete at a national and I saw them ride in April. The first event of the season was in Portland, Oregon, which is closest to my house, and I saw them ride. I'm like, "I can do that." And by the end of the summer, by August, I was able to compete in my first National in Arizona. Since then, we struggled through and it's a really, really small class. There was just the three of us and people said, "Oh, we don't need a lady's class" and "This is never going to work".

Christy Williams Richards:
And then now they're running three, four different lines in the U.S. National series. And each of those lines has three to four ladies on it. You know what I mean? So it's just when the opportunity's there, the ladies are stepping up. And so I think it's growing, and I think for people to start to learn to ride a motorcycle trials is such a lady-friendly way. The bikes are 150 pounds. So it's a little bit more in your way class, it's a little bit slower. Cause sometimes speed can be intimidating right off the bat. Yeah, the stuff that you see on YouTube videos can be fairly exciting and spicy, but it's very much choose your own adventure. So there's a lot of stuff that you can do without being wild and crazy and I think that ladies like that, it's a lot more balanced and precision, which lends itself to lady skillsets. So they definitely have an advantage on a trials like to learn as opposed to jumping on like a big 450 motorcrosser hoping for the best.

PJ Doran:
Christy, what do you think, clearly there's a lot of reasons you've been selected for the role that you're now in. From just from talking to you, it's clear that you're an ambassador for the sport. It seems at the highest level then your own team and your own brand. Are the riders that are now on your team, what are they looking to you for? You know, what are, what is, what do you see as your role for your team members beyond just getting them to a race and making sure the logistics happen?

Christy Williams Richards:
I think because I've been there for so many years, it's cool for me to know what they're going through. I think that's important. I also have a university degree in Kinesiology, which is Sports Science. So helping them train and figure out their training program. I created an off-bike, like a gym routine that is motorcycle specific. You do a lot of exercises, literally holding handlebars just to mimic what you're going to be doing on the bike. And so stuff like that is super helpful. And then I did compete in the world championship for eight years maybe. So I've spent quite a bit of time overseas, and figuring out some of the ropes there and getting to know people. So it's nice cause I have relationships over there where I've got a couple of guys on my team who want to go overseas and I can make a call and be like, Okay, I've got a rider who's interested, can we get a place to stay?

Christy Williams Richards:
Can we help him out, or what's the regulations on your requirements for your helmet decals and that kind of thing. So it's nice that I'm getting to use that experience and not just to be a story that you tell around the campfire when you're 80 and you're like when "back in my day", but I'm actually putting it to practical use here and I'm like, well when I went over this is what we did. Let's see if we can get that for you, or one better now, a couple of years later and then see how it works. So I like to think I'm of service to them.

PJ Doran:
Yeah, I can't imagine that you aren't of service to them. It's an impressive thing. Sherco has got to be really thinking of expanding their presence in the U.S., clearly, if they're just, they're bringing, it would seem their whole game to a higher level. This level of professionalism leading the way with someone doing the job that you're now doing. What are you looking forward to most? Is it, you'd mentioned having young kids on a team that is interesting that you get to have a such a wide range of riders. Do you pick up more people over the year or is this a play it by ear?

Christy Williams Richards:
It's a little bit played by ear. You know, we watch some of them, I've got some older riders on my team and trials is one of those great sports where people pick it up when they're young and they stick with it. So we've got people riding the U.S. Nationals. We have a senior 75 Class and they're out there having a great time. So it's not like they that we're kicking people off the team. But generally whenever riders get to be about, you 28 or 30 then they think, well maybe I should settle down a little bit or that kind of thing. Maybe not travel so much for the sports. So we lose some riders. We want to be able to pick up some riders, and just watch the young ones coming up. So it's actually really great for us to have that manufacturer presence at the Youth Nationals too.

Christy Williams Richards:
We're helping them out, but we're also scouting for talent. So I think that's really great. And I think for trials there's a lot of times where the country's so big and we're so spread out that we're not really getting the instruction that we need. And there're books everywhere. There's like basketball for dummies, or track and field for dummies, and you can go and you can look through it and pick up some tips, or some tricks, or some drills that you would do. And there's no thing like that for trials, right? You really have to find that one person who's willing to work with you. And I've been lucky. I've had a bunch of really great mentors. My Dad was my coach for a long time and even now I rode in an event yesterday and my Dad's out there coaching me, yelling at me.

Christy Williams Richards:
So I think it's really important to work with the youth and be able to give them the opportunity and then a little bit to see what's out there for them. For me, growing up without a lady's class and the Nationals, I was content to be a Sunday rider because what else would I do? And then all of a sudden there was a lady's class and I'm like, well maybe I could do that. And, and you had a goal to work towards and you started to work towards it. So now you know, you get the kids seeing that, "Oh well, maybe I could be on this team, maybe I could part of this Sherco FactoryONE team." And "that's cool. I could work hard to work towards that." So I think giving them the opportunity, letting them see what's out there now that there's going to be opportunities for trials, riders, even me, I didn't think a job like this was possible.

Christy Williams Richards:
It didn't exist. And then once the job is possible, I'm like, Oh, feet first, let's do this. So I think it's really, really cool to be able to work with the youth and help them see that there's something out there. And that's our big goal is that we want to be able to compete on a world level. And it's been a while since we've had a lot of riders over there competing. Every generation you get one or two people who's over there like taking a stab at it but really struggling cause they're on their own. Whereas if we could have three or four riders that are going over there together and they were able to get a van together and show up to all the events and help each other out, it would be a very different scenario. So we'd like to really promote the sport in America so that we can get to that level.

PJ Doran:
That's impressive. And it's what we're seeing in other arenas of two wheeled motor sports. The very same thing is in the road racing world, whereas collectively there's a group of people with hopefully enough suede to start organizing riders, and building stepping stones, which is what it sounds like you're talking about. Start them young. Show them the way, develop the skills and then give them a fighting advantage for when they might have the opportunity to get overseas and compete at the world level. Christy, again, we want to say thank you for joining us on Pit Pass and also want to give you a chance to thank any sponsors or anyone in particular that you'd like to mention. You've had a good long career and it sounds like the next chapter is going to be just as exciting as the ones so far.

Christy Williams Richards:
For sure. Just I'm on my way up. Obviously, I want to thank my family for putting so much time and effort into helping me be a trials rider. So that's like my Dad is my coach and my Mom best pit-Mom ever. Sandwiches for everyone.

PJ Doran:
That's awesome.

Christy Williams Richards:
And then I want to thank the FactoryONE motor sports team for giving me the opportunity Sherco what a great brand and just really making this big push that we can get as many people riding trials and getting to the next level as possible. And then on the FactoryONE team, we have a bunch of sponsors and I'm going to list them and I hope I don't forget anybody, FXR Gears is sponsoring us. Dunlop Tires, Low Tool, BP Fuels, Funnelweb Filters, Aero Helmets, Gaerne Boots. It's a huge, massive team effort to make this happen with 15 people on the team and being able to get to all the events. So just our sponsors are totally where it's at and we want to promote them and just take trials to the next level.

PJ Doran:
Awesome, Christy. Well, thank you again for joining us on Pit Pass. We want to thank Christy Williams for being part of our show, and we look forward to what you bring to the sport and Sherco in the future. Thanks again, Christy.

Christy Williams Richards:
Thanks for having me.

Music:
[inaudible]

Dave Sulecki:
We would like to thank Christy Williams Richards for joining us today, the Sherco Factory Moto One trials team captain for 2020. Really great girl and great talking to her, learned a lot. And trials, If you get a chance to go out and check it out, it is one of the most exciting forms of motorcycling you can watch and extremely challenging. This week's Pit Pass trivia question of the week was, "What year was present day motorcycle control layout made standard?" And the answer is 1972. MVSS123 was the standard that standardized motorcycle controls, foot controls, shift left in rear brakes, right hand controls left and front brake right. I still mess it up, but that is how a motorcycle is supposed to be laid out. How about you PJ?

PJ Doran:
Yeah, it's supposed to be the right answer. Of course, I've had forays into flat tracking and I have pretty much my entire life been around various vintage of motorcycles. So that is the exact year 72' cause I have numerous friends that have right in that vintage 69', 71' those eras of triumphs Norton's and they still had goofy as in opposite shift patterns. You had the shifter on the right versus the left. So I've encountered that of course in the flat track world. It's still somewhat common to move that break over to the right side so that you've got access to it all the way around a flat track course. But yes, it made life easier for a young guy trying to steal motorcycles from family and friends to know exactly which one was the clutch and which one was the break.

Dave Sulecki:
I can come to grips with the left and right shift break left and right. That's not a big deal. That doesn't bother me. But the hand controls. So do you ride mountain bikes, PJ?

PJ Doran:
Absolutely, and the brakes are opposite aren't they?

Dave Sulecki:
Exactly. So every time I get a mountain bike, the first thing I do is I swap them so that that front break is where it belongs cause invariably I grabbed the wrong one.

PJ Doran:
You're so correct. Yep. And I've got a scooter it, there are some scooters, not all where it's, no, I guess scooters have stayed the right way. It's mostly my mountain bikes, my road bikes, cause I have a pretty good sized fleet of bicycles and yes I have switched it on my mountain bike that has disc brakes because I have sent myself over the bars inadvertently a couple of times.

Dave Sulecki:
Well I do it anyway. But inadvertently I guess, grabbing the lever at the wrong time.

PJ Doran:
Grabbing the wrong lever. I go over the bars for numerous reasons, but that one I can take off the table usually.

Dave Sulecki:
I'm convinced mountain bikes are put on this world to hurt people.

PJ Doran:
And they do a fine job of it.

Music:
[inaudible 00:29:25]

PJ Doran:
I'll leave with a little bit of upcoming news. We've got, so the Sepang Test I mentioned for MotoGP was the 1st of the year. There are a total of three more tests in the coming weeks leading to, we're now under one month away from the beginning, the MotoGP circus slash series for the year, March six through eight that weekend will be in "cutter" or Qatar depending on how you pronounce that. For the opening round of the 2020 MotoGP Series. Cannot wait. Under 30 days and we're right about that mark as well for the Daytona 200 bike week deal. So we've got road racing, my passion kicking off in less than 30 days.

Dave Sulecki:
That's awesome. Good to see commin'. Super Cross racing coming up this weekend is the Tampa Supercross, February 15th that's Saturday night and that is the beginning of the 250 Supercross East series. So we're going to see again as I said before, a new mix of riders and all kinds of excitement.

PJ Doran:
Yep. A couple of rookies too, right.

Dave Sulecki:
Couple of rookies. And what you do have happen a lot of times is some 450 riders will step down to the 250 series to ride the East series. So it gets to be interesting when that happens cause you got guys that you see on one class jump into another.

PJ Doran:
And don't you usually get some 250 West riders who conversely bump up to a 450 to give it a go.

Dave Sulecki:
Absolutely, I do. So I'm kind of anxious to see who that might be.

PJ Doran:
Right on. Me too. Well, I'm looking forward to it.

Music:
[inaudible]

PJ Doran:
Thank you again to our guests for being with us today, and thank you for tuning in. If you enjoyed this episode, make sure to subscribe to us on your favorite podcast app where you'll get alerts when new episodes are uploaded. Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and pitpassmoto.com. This has been a production of Evergreen Podcast. A special thank you to Ed Coolingcamp, social media contributor, Chris Bishop, our producer, Leah Longbreak and audio engineer's, Sean [inaudible 00:31:25] and Eric Colt. Now, I'm PJ.

Dave Sulecki:
and I'm Dave.

PJ Doran:
See you next week on Pit Pass.

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