The Enthusiasts Guide from “Yes” to “I Do”

Host Leah Longbrake is pulling back the veil to bring you honest advice and creative ideas from those in the wedding industry. From the Engagement to the Honeymoon, get all the details you need from wedding and event experts on how to make it your best day ever!

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Live Streaming Your Wedding

| S:Livestreaming Your Wedding with Julie Albaugh of Wedding Market News
Live Streaming Your Wedding

Julie Albaugh, the founder of Wedding Market News and Julie’s Photography, shares her tips on live streaming your wedding, and why you should consider incorporating it into your big day. We discuss doing it yourself vs. hiring a pro, the estimated cost involved, and how you can let your family and friends know where to watch it.

Follow Julie and Wedding Market News on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube!

Get to know Julie:

Julie Albaugh is editor of WeddingMarketNews.com. Wedding Market was selected as #3 of the top 10 Social Media influencers in the Wedding Industry by Wed Biz Media. She speaks on a variety of topics on technology, social media and marketing. Live Streaming weddings is one of her passions that she does with her parent company Julie's Videography in and outside the U.S.



This has been a production of Evergreen Podcasts. A special thank you to Executive Producers David Moss, Gerardo Orlando, Production Director Brigid Coyne and Audio Engineer Eric Koltnow

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Leah Longbrake:
Julie, it's so awesome to have you on the show today. For those not familiar with Wedding Market News and yourself, give us a little background about the history of you and your business.

Julie Albaugh:
[inaudible 00:00:28] started videotaping weddings with another company, Julie's Videography. Then from there, 2010, I started Wedding Market News. I've always had a love of weddings and so I decided to take my love of weddings and start reporting what was going on in the industry by wedding industry trends, interviewing top industry leaders, going to conferences and talking with a lot of groups online. So, it's been very interesting.

Leah Longbrake:
Yeah, and you're considered top 10 in social media influencers in the wedding industry, and you yourself are a big name in the industry, so we're really, really happy to have you on today.

Julie Albaugh:
Oh, well, thank you.

Leah Longbrake:
So, the pandemic has really, obviously, turned the whole world upside down, but in the wedding industry in particular, it's made a lot of couples decide if they're going to postpone or go forward. Those that have gone forward have had to have smaller weddings and have started the new trend of live streaming their ceremony. That's what I'm excited to talk to you today about, because I'm sure a lot of couples are on the fence of whether or not they should do it, and if they do decide to do it, where do they start? So with that, why should couples consider live streaming their ceremony?

Julie Albaugh:
Well, with this pandemic, so many friends and relatives don't feel safe to come. I actually just did a wedding this past weekend, and this couple was very adamant. They knew that the pandemic would probably still be taking place and they took the precaution to call us six months ahead, of all things, and book it. We got them a unique domain name so people could type it in, they put it in their website, their invitations, so it was just really cool. It's just a way to keep all your friends and relatives involved in your day, even though they can't actually be there. And what better way to do it?

Leah Longbrake:
Is this something that now all videographers and photographers offer? So if you're looking to choose that particular person or company, it's something that they offer, or is this something that's still so new that it's something completely separate that you need to budget in?

Julie Albaugh:
That's very interesting that you said that. Not all videographers or photographers offer this service. In fact, at the wedding that I was at, there was a photographer/videographer there, besides myself, and we were talking about live streaming and how he said he didn't even feel comfortable taking on... It's such a different technology when you're put in... Data, internet, all of that plays an important part in making the stream good.

Leah Longbrake:
And with that then, what should couples be factoring in their budget for this? What are we looking at price-wise? I know it's going to vary by region, obviously, what's in New York City is going to be different than somewhere in Iowa, but there has to be some kind of overall budget idea, right?

Julie Albaugh:
Right, right. It ranges probably anywhere from $1,000 and up, depending on where you are in the country. There also could be problems with internet in certain parts of the country. I try to go to the location ahead of time to make sure what the internet connections are. But they may not be able to stream your wedding, depending on those factors.

Leah Longbrake:
What's a good resource for couples to look for someone to do this for them?

Julie Albaugh:
That's really interesting to say, because right now, even some of the major publications do not really put this as a place to find someone. I started doing live streaming seven years ago, so I went from mobile devices and then moved into more technical. There are other videographers that have gone into this, but to say you just have to start looking at [videographer 00:05:03] websites and see if it's something they have on their website, is really the only suggestion I can say at this point.

Leah Longbrake:
If someone's looking to maybe save money by trying to do it themselves, or have a family member or friend do it, what's the pros and cons of doing it yourself versus hiring a professional?

Julie Albaugh:
Most people that do them themselves are using mobile devices. One of the main things that happens when you use a mobile device, if you're not using any extra accessories is audio. Audio is the first thing, you will not be able to hear the vows. You will not be able to get up close. Mobile phones tend to be really wide, so you don't get up and close and personal with a wedding with a mobile phone or a tablet, so that's part of the problem.

Leah Longbrake:
So, look at it as a professional would be more like if a news station came on site and they're getting a live shot of your big day, they'd be able to get the wide shot of everyone, but also zoom in and get that emotion, so your grandma at home or your military friends overseas can see all the different aspects of the day.

Julie Albaugh:
Right, right. As I was talking to someone recently, because of the pandemic, so many people are doing live streaming for a lot of different events. Audio has been one of the things I've heard many of them say has been lacking in live streaming.

Leah Longbrake:
Interesting. You mentioned wifi, what are some other details that couples should consider when going into live streaming?

Julie Albaugh:
Well, if the videographer is knowledgeable in live streaming, they're not going to just use one type of data. They're going to have multiple types of data, and they would also look at the venue that you're at to see if they can get a standalone data from your [venue 00:07:24]. They're certainly not going to use a shared internet source from the location.

Leah Longbrake:
Just like your other vendors have to coordinate with each other, I'm sure it's extremely important that, if you do hire someone to do live stream, you have them work closely with your photographer, your videographer, your wedding planner, et cetera, because you don't want people standing in front of the camera.

Julie Albaugh:
Yeah. It was funny. The videographer says now, the photographer I was working with over the weekend, he says, "I now need to get a I'm live light." So I'm definitely working into adding that to my set of equipment.

Leah Longbrake:
That is a great call. So, with that... I had a point with that, with being live and dealing with others. Oh, what are the different kinds of streaming services available? It's not just Facebook live or YouTube live. What are the different streaming services that we're really needing to look at?

Julie Albaugh:
Well, there are some issues with using Facebook and even YouTube, especially if you're doing the reception or even ceremony with music involved. If there's copyrighted music, it's going to kill the feed. So we work with other sources that's not going to lock down your video. Yes, it's nice to put some Facebook stuff in, in groups and things, but when there's music involved, Facebook can just take it all away, so you got to be careful if you use Facebook or YouTube and all of that.

Leah Longbrake:
Oh my gosh. That's such a pro tip. I never would have considered the copyright infringement.

Julie Albaugh:
Yeah. There's a lot of people don't realize that that's a problem.

Leah Longbrake:
So with it, you get your custom URL.

Julie Albaugh:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Leah Longbrake:
What's the best way to share that with your family and friends? Because Joe Schmoe could come across it if you just post on your Facebook wall.

Julie Albaugh:
Yeah. They put it in their invitation. They also put it on their website. But there's possibilities of also putting it in an email and sending it out to your guest list.

Leah Longbrake:
With your years in the industry, how important do you find wedding websites for couples?

Julie Albaugh:
I was really intrigued by this couple's website. I mean, they had everything on there. They had their directions, where people would be staying, it was just really detailed. I think this is great for guests, because sometimes people have more questions than just their invitation, doesn't answer everything.

Leah Longbrake:
Right. Because if you forget something in your invitation, that's a great way just to go there and add it, like the dress code or, "Hey, we are going to live stream now, here's the code."

Julie Albaugh:
Yes.

Leah Longbrake:
Is there any etiquette that we should consider with live streaming?

Julie Albaugh:
Well, it's really important, as you said earlier, to make sure that the other wedding professionals that are there, especially for the ceremony, if you're just doing the ceremony, or even the reception, that they know that live streaming is taking place, so they don't get in the way, things like that. You can't edit things out, it's live. I let everybody know that's in the wedding party and so forth, "Okay. We are live streaming this." We say that at the rehearsal, I go to the rehearsal also as, a practice, so I know where everybody's coming in or everybody's leaving. So, that's kind of a rehearsal.

Leah Longbrake:
Yeah, because if any other vendors or family members are sitting around and think that they're whispering, that camera can pick it up.

Julie Albaugh:
Yes, that could happen.

Leah Longbrake:
So if you're a guest at a live streamed wedding, be very careful what you might say around that camera.

Julie Albaugh:
Well, we also put a microphone on the groom and so he knows that that's going to be on, so he has to be careful about what he says.

Leah Longbrake:
I can only imagine some of the stories that are coming out now from live stream weddings. What is your final advice for couples planning the big day?

Julie Albaugh:
Well, don't wait till the last minute. Think about, is all of your guests going to be coming? Who's coming, who's not? Would you still want them to be able to see the wedding virtually? Especially if you have a destination wedding, it's a good thing to have a live stream for that as well. My daughter has also just got engaged, and so we haven't really talked about this item, but she just got engaged about two weeks ago and she's definitely going to be planning a destination wedding. I don't even know where yet, so we're looking at a lot of different locations, but we need to decide, is she going to livestream this for the others that are not coming? And then also, keep in mind of the internet and all that if she does. But think advance, make sure you don't wait till the last minute, research different websites to see who has it available. And how long have they've been doing it, because there are some out there that it's just because of the pandemic just got on, but there's a lot involved.

Leah Longbrake:
Well, yeah, with a destination wedding I'm sure, with travel with equipment and everything, that's a whole other ball game.

Julie Albaugh:
Yes. That's the one thing, I've been traveling with Wedding Market for quite a few years, and I know how to pack really well. When you're taking equipment with you on the plane, you better know how to do it really well.

Leah Longbrake:
Oh, I bet, because they're going to search your bag.

Julie Albaugh:
Take it out. Take out all the [technology 00:14:30] [inaudible 00:14:32].

Leah Longbrake:
Well, I was going to say, I'm sure some of that equipment might go off unintentionally, just being metal or whatever it might be composed of.

Julie Albaugh:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Leah Longbrake:
What's your final piece of advice for industry pros and insiders that are listening?

Julie Albaugh:
I guess one of the things I've learned is a lot of people, even wedding planners, they might think about live streaming, but they're really probably only thinking about it from mobile devices or friends and relatives. Because it's such a new thing, maybe they haven't really thought of some of the more professional ways of doing it, depending on where they are in the country, because sometimes the bigger cities are where you'll find these types of services, and not necessarily in the smaller cities.

Leah Longbrake:
My final question for you, you Julie, what is your favorite moment in a wedding? No matter how many weddings you've been a part of and to, what is your favorite moment you look forward to?

Julie Albaugh:
The favorite thing I look forward to at a wedding? Wow. My favorite part when I'm at a wedding is when I see the groom see the bride for the first time. That's my favorite moment.

Leah Longbrake:
That's my favorite in the ceremony too. When they get all choked up and that look on their face.

Julie Albaugh:
Yes.

Leah Longbrake:
You see the love.

Julie Albaugh:
Yes.

Leah Longbrake:
Well, thank you so much, Julie, for being with us today. How can we get more information on you and Wedding Market News?

Julie Albaugh:
Well, you can find more about me at weddingmarketnews.com, or juliesvideography.com for live streaming.

Leah Longbrake:
Awesome. Thank you so much, Julie.

Julie Albaugh:
Oh, well, thank you so much.

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