Where Style Meets Substance

Hollywood fashion expert, VIP personal shopper and commentator Joseph "Joe" Katz brings you interviews with celebrities and influencers about their style and personal experiences. He also shares the best beauty & lifestyle tips and tricks to help you look and feel your best.

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David Jonsson: Star of the HBO Series Industry Discusses Life in London, Acting, and His Personal Style

David Jonsson: Star of the HBO Series Industry Discusses Life in London, Acting, and His Personal Style

David Jonsson, star of the new hit show Industry on HBO, shares candid stories about his early life, growing up in London, and his journey into acting. Tune in to hear what it was like working with the shows' executive director, Lena Dunham, and his other cast mates on the HBO show. This is truly an inspiring interview about a shy kid who came from humble beginnings on his rise to starring on a hit network show.

More About David:

David got his start in acting being offered a scholarship to attend RADA by Warner Bros. His first role out of drama school was Davison in Mary Stuart at the Almeida alongside Lia Williams and Juliet Stevenson, which was then transferred to the West End. David went on to star opposite David Tennant in Patrick Marber's Don Juan in Soho at the Wyndham's Theatre. David's TV credits include ITV's Endeavour as well as the role of Isaac Turner in series two of Fox's Deep State. David was recently named on Digital Spy's Rising : 30 Black British stars of tomorrow.

Follow David Jonsson on Twitter and Instagram!



The Katz Walk is a production of Evergreen Podcasts. A special thank you to Executive Producer Gerardo Orlando, Producer Leah Longbrake and Audio Engineer Dave Douglas.

Joe Katz:
David, thanks so much for being on the show. I'm so excited to have you here. Congratulations on all your success-

David Jonsson:
Thank you so much.

Joe Katz:
... with Industry. It's a great show.

David Jonsson:
Thank you.

Joe Katz:
I've been watching.

David Jonsson:
Yeah, it's been crazy.

Joe Katz:
Yeah. Yes, yes, yes. Yeah. It's so exciting. There's so many different things. Well, I want to get into that, but I also want to get in... I love to know more about the people that I interview, because there's so much about your character on Industry and all of that, that we'll get into later in the show, but I also just, I love to learn about guests, just a little bit more about your history and where you started. So we'll get back to Industry in just a minute, because I've been watching different episodes and it's very exciting. How did Industry come about? Because I looked you up some, and you grew up in London, right?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, yeah. I'm an East London boy. I grew up in East London, which East London's kind of cool now. It's become like, I mean, the best American comparison I can make is maybe how Brooklyn's quite cool now.

Joe Katz:
Oh yeah.

David Jonsson:
That's kind of what it was. I mean, growing up, it wasn't as nice as it is now, at all. Yeah, anyway, I grew up in East London. And, I mean, I've been... [inaudible 00:07:04]. Talking about where I come from and how I got into it still feels like a weird, new thing for me. But yeah, I went to school and I read loads and I went to drama school. And then, after that, things just went really steady for me. I did some theater, which was wonderful, which I always love and I always come back to. And yeah, and then TV came along and Industry is my second TV job, so that was a real cool land.

Joe Katz:
Tell me a little bit about growing up. What was it like for you growing up? Because you gave an example, it was kind of like Brooklyn, before it got gentrified a little bit.

David Jonsson:
Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I mean, East London's my home, man. My family still lives there. It's home. I can't take anything away from it. But it was definitely growing up in the 2000s, I guess, my mum didn't want me out late at night, at all. And anywhere I did go, she was like, "Where are you going? What time are you going home? Your brother will take you." It was that kind of neighborhood we grew up. [crosstalk 00:08:28] Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Joe Katz:
Yeah. Was it a little bit dangerous at night?

David Jonsson:
Oh yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. You didn't want to be caught in East London past 7:00, 8:00, because you just never knew what was going to happen. It is definitely that kind of neighborhood, but it's definitely changed massively now. Again, for lack of a better term, it's a bit gentrified. But for the better, I suppose. But yeah, my mum carried on trying to find ways to keep me occupied. I was a very introverted kid growing up. I think I always, and I still do anyway, I always found it really hard talking to people. And, I don't know, I was just really shy as a child, I guess. That was one thing to kind of overcome, for myself. But, of course, in East London, where everything is so bullish, in a way, you have to find your way of surviving, I suppose. So I had to develop something that meant that I can communicate with people and talk and say what I mean, mean what I say, all that kind of stuff.

David Jonsson:
But my mum, being the brilliant woman that she is, she carried on trying to find ways to occupy me and keep me motivated. I did loads of different kinds of sports. I did some boxing. We had a local gym called the Peacock Gym and I used to go round there as a child after school, and then I would come home. It was just ways to keep my off the street, really, and getting caught up into the wrong things, especially being an introverted kid, inevitably I guess, what you want is just friends, so you might find yourself doing the wrong thing. Yeah, I mean, my upbringing was mostly that. Just school, maybe the boxing gym, and home. And my brother would sort me out with everything in between. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
Huh. Is your brother older or younger than you?

David Jonsson:
He's older. I'm the youngest.

Joe Katz:
Oh, out of how many? Just two?

David Jonsson:
Out of four. I got my-

Joe Katz:
Oh four.

David Jonsson:
... eldest sister. I got my brother and my older sister and I'm the baby, so I get away with loads.

Joe Katz:
Oh, you're the baby. The baby of four. Okay. Did they keep busy, as well? Your brother and sisters? Or did they mingle in the neighborhood and stuff like that?

David Jonsson:
I mean, I say that the family... we definitely mingled, in bits, in ways. My brother was kind of like a role model for me, because he really found a way to not only find a way to be respected and do what you need to do to get by, but also he never got caught up in all the nonsense that was going on around. And also, it meant, because he was that kind of guy, because he was, I mean, for lack of a better term, kind of cool. It meant that I was his brother. So people going, "Oh, no, no. That's Dante's brother. Don't touch him. That's Dante's brother. Leave him alone." [crosstalk 00:11:44]

Joe Katz:
Oh, he's cool, too.

David Jonsson:
I mean, I'm not. I wouldn't consider myself cool. I think he's cool. Yeah, because he was cool, I kind of got by.

Joe Katz:
His name was Dante?

David Jonsson:
Dante. Yeah. My brother.

Joe Katz:
Dante.

David Jonsson:
I'd say my brother was cool. I wouldn't say that I was necessarily cool. My brother was. And therefore, you kind of get a cool immunity, by proxy. I think I got that. It kind of rubbed off on me. That's cool.

Joe Katz:
That's very cool. So then, you learned how to box, then?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, yeah. I mean, I never did an amateur career or anything like that. But yeah, I used to go to the gym quite a lot. I don't know, I think even at that age, if you find something that you like, you get really serious about it. So I used to go all the time and I used to love it. You go and you hit a bag or just spar with someone and learn the basics, and it was a lovely experience for me. Yeah, I loved it.

Joe Katz:
I mean, could you protect yourself? Did you learn enough to, if you were going to get in a fight, you knew what to do?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, definitely.

Joe Katz:
You do?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, I mean, yeah. I mean, Joe, I don't want to fight no one, but yeah-

Joe Katz:
I'm not advocating violence. I am not-

David Jonsson:
Are you sure?

Joe Katz:
... I promise, David. No, I'm not. I'm not. Although, let's go fight. I don't even know how to punch. I don't even know how to punch.

David Jonsson:
Oh, come on, Joe, you do.

Joe Katz:
You could teach me how to punch. I'm not advocating it, but I just think it's kind of cool to show that you've got this boxer side to you that nobody knew about.

David Jonsson:
Oh wow, yeah. Yeah, it's a thing that I definitely thank my mum for. More than anything, again, it was you definitely learned how to defend yourself, which was a great skill, being in East London. But it was a discipline, and I think that that was the greatest gift that she tried to give me, which is anything you want, just be serious about it. And so be serious about it, you got to show up, you got to dedicate it to yourself in some way or form. And I think at that age even, what was I? I think I was like eight, nine, at the time, it really stuck with me. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
Wow. And how long did you do that for? How long did you go to boxing?

David Jonsson:
Well, I did it among other sports.

Joe Katz:
Activities?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, around between nine and I'd say around 14, 15. A long time.

Joe Katz:
Oh, long time.

David Jonsson:
Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Joe Katz:
Did you ever have to use it?

David Jonsson:
Well, should I plead the fifth on this? I mean.

Joe Katz:
We want to know. You're probably going to get cast in some big, I don't know, Sylvester Stallone boxing movie. I don't know, probably.

David Jonsson:
No, no.

Joe Katz:
That's what's going to happen.

David Jonsson:
I mean that would be really cool.

Joe Katz:
I don't know.

David Jonsson:
I won't say no. But, yes. I definitely learned enough. Let's say that.

Joe Katz:
Yeah, yeah. Well, it's funny, because when I watch you and then I watch you on the show, you do seem so shy. You seem very reserved and very soft spoken. But when I watch you on the show, it's different, but I know that's acting. I mean, that's acting.

David Jonsson:
It is acting.

Joe Katz:
But you do come off much more subdued and, I don't know, a little bit shyer than what I expected.

David Jonsson:
Thanks, Joe. I mean, I guess, yeah. I mean, Gus, the character in Industry, he is super different to me in many ways. But one of the things that he definitely have is this bullish thing about him, which is like a cares about nothing but just says what he means, means what he says. And that's something that I found, actually, quite fun to do. I really enjoyed doing that, because it's not really necessarily my mode of operandus. But yeah, I mean, you're making me shy, Joe. No, I don't know.

Joe Katz:
Oh, I am? No. No, I think it's good. But you even said, when you were growing up you were more shy, a little bit more introverted, right?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely.

Joe Katz:
Yeah.

David Jonsson:
Yeah, yeah. It was funny, because I was around my mum's the other day, just having a cup of tea with her, which was lovely and she said to me, she mentioned a time that... I come from a big African-Caribbean family, and my mum mentioned this time, and I think it was a cousin's birthday, something like that, and it meant a lot of family was going to be there. My mum got me this three-piece suit. I think it was in reference to Industry and my constant wearing of suits, as Gus. So she was talking about this time that she got me this wonderful three-piece suit and I got ready for this party and I just didn't want to go. I really didn't want to go. I think I was just terrified of seeing all these people, all these aunties and uncles and having to say hello and talk. I mean, I must have been like seven at the time. And my mum was like, "You were terrified." I was so terrified that just as we were about to leave, I think we got into the car and I threw up. I just vomited all over.

Joe Katz:
Really?

David Jonsson:
All over myself. And I weren't sick, I weren't nothing. I was just terrified of having to talk to these people. And my mum told me that story, in reference to going... she's like, "Look how far you've come." And I was like, "No, mum. I still vomit now." It doesn't stop.

Joe Katz:
Do you vomit each time you prepare for the show?

David Jonsson:
Each time. Before every take, there's a bucket on set.

Joe Katz:
Every take you're throwing up. You have to have a spit bucket.

David Jonsson:
That's really-

Joe Katz:
No, but do you truly, do you kind of get nervous like that, when you do a shoot?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, I mean, yes. I definitely do. I'd be lying if I said I didn't get, so some degree, nervous. But I think I've definitely learned that it's through watching other great actors and talking to them, it's a good thing. You learn to use those things, because it means that you care. So yeah, I've definitely learned how to harvest that energy for something better and bigger than yourself. Also, I guess, doing a show like Industry or any other character, frankly, you kind of realize that this person is way bigger than yourself, and their feelings are way more significant than your own at this one specific time. And I think that is humbling, just to go swallow that vomit and crack on. Do you know what I mean?

Joe Katz:
Yeah. It reminds me, you said the character Gus is kind of like... it reminds me of what you said about your brother, Dante. He says what he means and does what he... Or what did you say? Isn't that what you described your brother as?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, says what he means, means what he says. Yeah, that's him. Yeah, that's my brother. Yeah, funny enough, my brother does have... I never thought about this, but he does, he has quite a lot of Gus similarities. Maybe I took some of the inspiration for Gus from him. But yeah, he does definitely have some similarities. I think we all have some levels of shyness to us, but he is much more forward, which is a great trait.

Joe Katz:
Yeah, that's great. And so, you're able to kind of push through that, because I would think it reminds me of if somebody's so scared to speak or being in public speaking, they just avoid. But you push forward. What made you decide, "You know what? I'm shy. I feel shy, but you know what? I want to be an actor. I want to be out there?"

David Jonsson:
Yeah. I think it was just the love of the art. It's so incredible. I mean, I grew up on film. My dad had stacks of VHS cassettes and we'd watch films like Mahogany and Lady Sings the Blues and all these, and we watched loads of Bond. All these really great, big amazing films, and I just loved it. I just loved looking at these actors just being other people and I thought it was so enlightening. And this was even before, Joe, this was even before I started to do my own research into film and TV and find my own proper loves. So I even think from that age, when my dad showed me that kind of thing, I was hooked. And I think, then, you start to research and you start to realize that sacrifices that people put into becoming these other people, which is just, it's colossal. And, again, it just puts everything in perspective. If this is really what you love and you cherish it that much, you would make the sacrifices. Yeah, I think that meant a lot to me.

Joe Katz:
Was your dad and mom, where they interested in entertainment?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, yeah. My dad is super interested in entertainment. My dad is a music fiend. He loves music, which definitely rubbed off on my brother, because my brother's a singer-songwriter.

Joe Katz:
Really?

David Jonsson:
So he does that much more. I mean, I love music, as well, but I give that to my brother. And my dad also loves film, and I guess that's what I took on. He loves film, he loves TV, he loves acting. He loves those great, great performances. Yeah. And I'd say my mum's the more logical out of the two of them. My dad's really sensing and feeling. He'd cry at Gone with the Wind every single time.

Joe Katz:
Oh, I love it.

David Jonsson:
And my mum would be like, "Okay, let's go to dinner." My mum weren't really into that kind of stuff. Yeah, I kind of got the best of both worlds between the two of them. A pragmatic sense, but also a real feeling bit from my dad, as well.

Joe Katz:
I think you're a little more like your dad. Don't you think?

David Jonsson:
I think so, yeah.

Joe Katz:
Listen to me. We're having a therapy session right here.

David Jonsson:
I know. What happened?

Joe Katz:
No, but it's lovely. It's interesting to know, because you watch people on screen and then when you sometimes pull back, I always find it so interesting to understand where you came from and all of that. And so, when you decided, I want to go to acting school. Did you have the money to go or how did you go about it? Because you went to [RADA 00:22:36] in New York. How did that happen and did your parents support you? Or how did you figure out, "How am I going to pay for this?"

David Jonsson:
I mean, no. Joe, it was an absolute wing and a prayer. Again, I've got the best parents, man. They're super supportive and they're immigrants, essentially. So they come from a place where it's like, education, be knowledgeable, be right. But, for some reason, what they've taught us, myself, my brother and my sister is, as long as you're serious about something and you love it, go for it. If you don't go for it, you'll never know. I mean, they were always supportive of me wanting to pursue acting and do whatever I could do. And I guess it came to the point where I was like, "Now, I really want to train. I want to get better. I want to know what it is I'm going into." I looked at this great people like Sidney Poitier and Ralph Fiennes, all these really amazing actors, and I was just like, "How do they do what they do?"

David Jonsson:
And, again, me coming from a music background, you have people like Miles Davis, who went to Julliard and all these really great people, that they didn't just get out of bed, they really learned what they did. So it was really important to me to do that. I auditioned for two schools at the time, which was RADA in London and Julliard in New York. And yeah, I was really lucky. I got into both.

Joe Katz:
You got into both?

David Jonsson:
Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Joe Katz:
Wow.

David Jonsson:
Which was really cool. But yeah, I'm a Brit boy, so I thought I might as well stay in London. My family's here, as well, so that means I was closer to my family. Yeah, and I got a scholarship, so that really, really helped. I got a scholarship from Warner Bros., which meant that I didn't have to worry about that. Without that, I don't know if I would've been able to go.

Joe Katz:
So wait, again, you got a scholarship from Warner Brothers?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, Warner Brothers. Yeah. It's a long story, but I'll give it to you.

Joe Katz:
Give it to me.

David Jonsson:
Warner Bros. were doing, at the time, Alan Rickman, who's obviously a fantastic actor, rest his soul, he went to Warner Bros. at the time and said, "Listen, you've got all of our actors from RADA and we deserve money, basically. Give us some money." Obviously, he's talking about Harry Potter and all the amazing actors like Fiona Shaw and Ralph Fiennes, all these brilliant people. So he said, "You should give us money, to pluck the next generation of talent." And they turned around and said, "Sure." And, basically, that was the first year that I applied to RADA, that was the first year they decided to do the scheme. Essentially, I applied and the director or RADA, a lovely man, Ed Kemp, decided to support me forward, a few of us forward, for this scholarship. And yeah, they chose me, so that was really helpful.

Joe Katz:
So it was a fully paid scholarship for four years?

David Jonsson:
Three years. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
Wow. Three years?

David Jonsson:
Yeah.

Joe Katz:
Wow. That's amazing.

David Jonsson:
Thank you.

Joe Katz:
So could your family have helped you or it would've been too tough for them, really, to start?

David Jonsson:
I think tuition fees would've broke the camel's back. My mum really helped me out, as did my dad. They definitely helped me with being a student and living off spaghetti and all that kind of stuff. But, beyond that, it's the tuition fees and Warner Bros., again, shout out to Warner Bros., because they really did me a big one. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
That's amazing. Wow. That's so cool. And so, I mean, being accepted to Julliard that's huge, too.

David Jonsson:
Yeah, yeah. It's a big thing. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
Who would think this shyer kid and you got all these chops. You've got these natural... don't you think?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, I guess so. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
I would say. Yeah.

David Jonsson:
Thank you. Thank you, Joe.

Joe Katz:
Wow. Well, that's cool. And so, yeah, it's interesting because I just like to learn how people grew up and where you came from. And so, then, when you were growing up, did you think, "This is what I want to do. I want to be an actor"? Or did you ever think, "I think I want to go into banking," or something?

David Jonsson:
No. I reckon, for me, I said really young that I wanted to do... this is going to sound really corny, Joe, so just cut me off, but I said I wanted to do something great. I didn't care what it was, I just said I wanted to do something big and great, and creative, I guess. And I always loved acting, like I said, I always loved watching these films and these big things. And it kind of came to me organically. Around 15, 16, around the time that I quit boxing and doing all that kind of stuff. That was when it really started to roll into being like, "Okay, this is what I'm going to do." And, for me, when that happened, there was no looking back. I said, "Either dedicate yourself to this or just don't do anything." I didn't think about going into banking, unfortunately. I might've been quite good.

Joe Katz:
Good. Banking is not for you. Although, banking is great for the show.

David Jonsson:
It's great for the show, right?

Joe Katz:
And what you're doing. Yes. If you weren't an actor, what would you do?

David Jonsson:
Oh, if I weren't an actor, I'd do something like astronomy or, I mean, or be an astronaut. I love space and I've always loved that kind of... the world things. Kismet. Life. And yeah, that's what I'd do.

Joe Katz:
Oh, that's interesting. Huh. Maybe you could do an astronaut movie or something like that.

David Jonsson:
Yeah, astrophysicist, that kind of hero. Maybe.

Joe Katz:
Right, right, right. Whoa. You got to work on the show with Lena Dunham, who, she did the first episode, right?

David Jonsson:
She did.

Joe Katz:
She directed?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, she did.

Joe Katz:
What was that like?

David Jonsson:
Oh man. Lena Dunham.

Joe Katz:
Honestly. No, you can say everything.

David Jonsson:
No, I would tell you. Joe, I swear I'd tell you.

Joe Katz:
You would tell, because we're just talking. It's just us.

David Jonsson:
It's just us.

Joe Katz:
Nobody's listening.

David Jonsson:
No, honestly, Joe, Lena Dunham is just a sweetheart. Okay, so I'll rewind. I met her, it was funny, because I was auditioning for this show. I got the script when I was doing another show at the time. I was in Morocco, filming in the desert, and I got this script... I was playing MI-6 character at the time, so it was a really different role to Gus from Industry, but I got the script through and that was part of the reason why I was like, "Oh man, this would be so..." It was just polar opposite to what I was doing at the time. So anyway, I did a tape and I sent it off, and then I get back to London and I heard, "They really like you, we'll wait and see." Then the new year came around and they said, "They want to bring you in for another read."

David Jonsson:
So I came in, did the read. It went really well. And then they said, "Okay, just hang tight. We'll let you know." And then, things kind of slowed down and I think it took a month or two, and then finally my agent called me and said, "They really like you. The reason why it's taking so long is because they're in talks about directors. And there was one director, but now they'll be looking at another director who is suddenly, possibly coming on board, but we'll keep you updated." And I was like, "Okay. Who is this director, dude?" They way they made it sound, well my agent made it sound, was it was Steven Spielberg.

Joe Katz:
Oh, right.

David Jonsson:
I was like, "Who is this person that's going to come along?" And then, I remember getting the phone call and my agent was like, "Okay, don't freak out." And I was like, "I'm not going to freak out. That's not the kind of person I am. Just tell me what's going on." And she said, "Lena Dunham is directing the first episode." And I freaked out. The reason why I freaked out is because I think I was like 14 or 15 when I first saw Girls.

Joe Katz:
Oh yeah.

David Jonsson:
And it blew my mind. I genuinely blew... I don't know, I guess maybe at that age you're kind of just waking up to the world and the possibility of that naughty things.

Joe Katz:
Naughty business. Yes.

David Jonsson:
All that naughty business, right? So I remember that, I mean, I remember thinking, "God, Lena Dunham is so great." And then you have great actors from that show like Adam Driver. I was just blown away. I've always loved Lena Dunham. I thought she was a really amazingly talented creator. Anyway, so then I met Lena. She said, basically, that she wanted to meet me. So I came in for my final read and we met over Skype, because she couldn't make it to London at the time or to Cardiff, rather. And honestly, I'm black, so I can't blush. But if I weren't, I would have been absolutely bright red, because she's got this infectious energy, which it's just so lovable. And then, when you get to working with her, she's so free. I've never met a director, in my short-lived career, I've never met a director who is so, just do whatever, let's see what happens.

David Jonsson:
We'd do one take, which was as written. And then she'd go, "Okay, David, let's do one for you." And, personally, I'd do a take and I'd go completely off-script, I'd just do whatever I felt like at the time, what I believed Gus would do, and then she'd come to me and whisper and she would be like, "That was great. Let's do another one and why don't you just throw the chair this time." And we'd do things that would never, ever, ever make it to the show, because, of course, Gus won't do that, but for some reason, for me, it felt really freeing. And, for her, it was really entertaining. It was just a wonderful way to explore the character and with a director like that, it's kind of an actor's dream. So yeah, I love Lena.

Joe Katz:
Wow. Oh, so some of those takes you wouldn't use-

David Jonsson:
No.

Joe Katz:
... but it would just be for you guys. Yeah.

David Jonsson:
Yeah. Totally, totally. And yeah, what kind of director does that, right? Inevitably, you're on a time frame and you've got to move forward. But she was just like, "No, let's find something. Let's find something that feels real." And that was the beauty of having her in the first episode, because it kind of set us up, all of us, for the next seven, eight episodes, because it meant that we then, we knew our characters, because we did stuff like just character study, so we can just improvise and be what we want it to be as those characters, as opposed to these young people tipping around our characters. So she was wonderful. Absolutely, I love her to pieces.

Joe Katz:
Always, when I think of Girls, I always think of her being naked. It was always sex and naked and she was uninhibited and I feel like, in a way, she kind of gave some of that to the show, a little. I don't know. Did you feel that?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, a little bit. I definitely think that having Lena as a point of call. I mean, the boys who wrote the show, Mickey Down and Konrad Kay, who are just geniuses, they definitely gave the show it's flavor and its style. But Lena definitely came along and I think she gave all of us a sense of, "Go here, because I've been here before and it's okay and it's cool." Which meant that all of us were like, "She set the bar. You have to meet Lena where she was." And she told us, she was like, when she first wrote Girls and when it got commissioned and when it was happening she was like the same age as all of us, at the time.

David Jonsson:
We sat at her kitchen table in this little cottage in rural Cardiff. It was really weird. There was cows everywhere. It was cool. But, anyway, we sat around this table eating pizza and she was just saying, "I was the same age as you guys. I've been here before. You're going to be fine. Just give yourself to it," and that really stuck with me, again. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
That's cool. What is one thing she made you do or had you do on set that was wildly uncomfortable?

David Jonsson:
What did Lena make me do?

Joe Katz:
You can say it, nobody's listening. It's just me and you. I won't tell. I promise I won't tell.

David Jonsson:
No, do you know, I'm genuinely trying to think. What did she make me do that was wildly uncomfortable?

Joe Katz:
That you're like, "Oh, this is so out of my comfort zone."

David Jonsson:
Do you, I'll be honest, Joe, I mean, my comfort zone is pretty... it takes a lot to surprise me, personally, especially when I'm in the zone, right? But, I don't know, I couldn't answer that. We did everything. I remember there was a time, for instance, there was a time when we did a take and, actually, I think it kind of made it into the show in its smaller form. It's in episode one and [Hari 00:36:28] who's in episode one, I think he kindly books the meeting to go in with Lucinda, our senior, anyway she says, "Hari, you're in the meeting. Gus, I hope you don't mind." And I go, "No, no, no. Not at all."

David Jonsson:
And, at the time, my character's eating, I think he's eating Cheerios or something, he's kind of eating his cereal at his work desk. And I remember Lena was like, "Let's just try him eating various different things and see what happens." So I think I had Cheerios, I think I had oat milk, I think I had almond butter on toast. And with every single take she was like, "Just go a bit more wild with it." So there was times when I was shoving it on my face and just being like, "Yeah, no, it's good for you. Absolutely." So I remember that was really good moment, but we did loads of things like this. It's actually really hard to think about what we even did.

Joe Katz:
Oh, that's cool. That's cool. And so, your character he's always, in Industry, if people check it out on HBO, which you should, it's very cool and you get into the mode of it and you kind of follow everybody's lives. But you're always so dressed up. You're suited up. You're like Wall Street kind of vibe. Is there a part of you... when you think about fashion, since I'm a stylist and I've got my bow tie on. I don't know if that officially makes me a stylist, but I'm a stylist. And so, are you a suit and a tie guy before you were seven years old going to see all your family in that three-piece suit?

David Jonsson:
My aunties and uncles. Yeah. No, I've always loved a suit and tie. My grandad... he'd wake up out of bed in a suit and tie and a three-piece. He was always just incredibly well-dressed. And I think that always taught me something, like a gentleman is always dressed very, very, very well. So I've always loved a suit and tie. Yeah, I mean, honestly I get off on a really good Tom Ford suit. I mean, that's just kind of dreamy for me. And, obviously, I don't wear a suit every single day, but I do love a suit. I do.

Joe Katz:
Have you ever worn a Tom Ford suit?

David Jonsson:
I got really close to wearing one once, because we were meant to do an event before we got put into lockdown, and I think I was really close to wearing a Tom Ford suit, but no I haven't, I haven't yet, if you're listening Tom Ford.

Joe Katz:
Well, we're putting this out to Tom. We're putting it out in the osmosis. Yes.

David Jonsson:
[crosstalk 00:39:15] Tom. I promise I'll make it look good. I'll promise.

Joe Katz:
You'll make him look good. Yes, yes. What is your style? What do you feel comfortable in? Do you like more dressed? If you were to give any... what's your vibe? What's your style?

David Jonsson:
It depends on how I'm feeling. I really do. I mean, I wake up sometimes and what I really want is just to put on a hoodie and some jeans and some boots and go for a walk in the woods. That's definitely a vibe of mine. Occasionally, if I'm going out for a drink or a pint with mates, I'd wear just a t-shirt with a nice jacket and some nice trousers. That's really cool as well. Also, I do kind of love my sneakers. I'm a bit of sneaker head. However, I mean, I say all this, Joe, I think comfort over anything is really important to me. I wouldn't go around wearing something that I just feel uncomfortable in. Just because it looks good it's like, "No, dude, I can't work like that." But I do switch it up from time to time. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
What are your favorite sneakers?

David Jonsson:
Okay. I mean, I always have a pair of Nike Air Force 1s, always in my wardrobe. Just clean white. Always. They're just always there. They're on rotation. And beyond that, I think I love Jordans. I'm a really big fan of Jordans. All of them. They're just, they're pretty dope.

Joe Katz:
Here in LA, we have a street called Melrose and then we have Fairfax, and there's all these sneaker shops and all these places. There's new shoes that always come out. I didn't know if there's certain ones that come out, limited edition stuff that you're crazy about.

David Jonsson:
Always. My problem is I go, I have to turn those notifications off, because if I see them, I'm always going to enter this raffle and just spend.

Joe Katz:
Oh, what you wanted.

David Jonsson:
Yeah. But I just, I try and stay away from all that. Just because, again, you end up with way too much sometimes and it can become obsessive. Me, personally, my Air Force 1s, some Jordans, I'm good.

Joe Katz:
Now, just going forward, we're probably coming to an end soon. I feel like time just keeps ticking away. But I have just a few more questions, David. Now that you've done Industry, are you seeing more things coming at you? Or do still have to audition or people are like, "I saw you on Industry. I want him on. He's like my Brad Pitt. I have to have him."

David Jonsson:
No. Yes, I'm super grateful. And something I would say, actually, is it's weird. It's really weird it being out, because we spent the better part of six months in rural Cardiff shooting this high finance show, to the point where, of course we knew it was HBO, of course I knew it was HBO, but I kind of really didn't think anyone would watch it. And now to have people watch it and to have it be received so lovely, is kind of insane. So yeah, to answer your question, I'd definitely say I'm getting a couple more things through, which is really lovely. I mean, I say all this, Joe, I mean, I'm not afraid to hunt for my own food. If I have to go and audition, I will, happily. I mean, hopefully I won't vomit in the room, because yeah.

Joe Katz:
Because of your nerves.

David Jonsson:
Because of my nerves.

Joe Katz:
No, you won't. And you can call me before you audition, we'll talk about it.

David Jonsson:
Can I? Do you mind?

Joe Katz:
Yes, call me. Yes, yes, yes.

David Jonsson:
Oh Joe, thank you.

Joe Katz:
Or just text me and we'll do a text and then I'll make sure you don't throw up. No, I know.

David Jonsson:
Thank you so much, Joe.

Joe Katz:
Yes, of course. So you feel comfortable now, there's a lot of good things coming up, pretty much?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, definitely. Definitely. Yeah, again, I'm just really, really grateful and it's just about finding the right things, I suppose, that kind of fit. Because, inevitably, I guess as an actor, you never want to do the same things twice or you never want to feel like you're typecast, is the word I suppose. So yeah, it's just about finding the right fit, but I'm definitely super grateful. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
When you say typecast, do you mean another financial show?

David Jonsson:
Yeah.

Joe Katz:
Or a particular character?

David Jonsson:
No, anything. I think, inevitably, you want to explore. This is going to sound terrible, Joe, you might have to edit this out.

Joe Katz:
No, it won't.

David Jonsson:
But you want to explore the human condition, right? You want to find different things in yourself, in these characters that weren't present to your last character. And that can be anything, it hasn't always got to be doom and gloom, but it's just something different and I think, for me, when I read Industry, having done the show that I was in before. It was very present, I just knew that I just thought Gus was just insanely present, insanely alive on the pages, that of course I wanted to bring him to life. I just thought it would be wonderful. So it's that kind of vibe that you definitely want to feel with a script, but I'm young, so I just want to have fun and play around and see what comes in. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
But sometimes, I suppose, if somebody comes to you with a really big check to do the same thing, would you do it? I'll do it if you won't do it.

David Jonsson:
Come on, Joe.

Joe Katz:
I swear, David. I'll do it if you won't do it. I'll say it's you and we'll do it together.

David Jonsson:
Yeah, shall we do that?

Joe Katz:
And we'll split it. How about that?

David Jonsson:
We'll split it. No one will ever know.

Joe Katz:
We'll split it.

David Jonsson:
No one will ever know.

Joe Katz:
Yeah.

David Jonsson:
That's great. Yeah.

Joe Katz:
Right, right.

David Jonsson:
Let's do it. Great. Deal.

Joe Katz:
Okay, David, we got to end soon now, but I do have one question, one last burning question, what's one thing that you haven't told anybody before? That maybe you want people to know or maybe you're shy about it, but you're just like, "I'm just going to say it."

David Jonsson:
Okay. I don't know, Joe. What's one thing I haven't told anyone before?

Joe Katz:
It doesn't have to be crazy personal. Though, if you want to, because it's just us, nobody will know.

David Jonsson:
Okay. Yeah, I've never told anyone that I really, really enjoy spicy food sometimes. No, no, that's not true. Not incredibly spicy food. But spicy foods, I mean, I'm from the motherland, right? I mean, is that a terrible answer? I'm just trying to figure out something to tell you.

Joe Katz:
No, that's okay.

David Jonsson:
Is that okay?

Joe Katz:
I'll take it. I mean, yeah. If you've got more, I'll take that, too.

David Jonsson:
No way.

Joe Katz:
I'm kind of grabby.

David Jonsson:
Are you grabby? Okay, well-

Joe Katz:
I'm very grabby.

David Jonsson:
... if you need another one, I'll give you another one. But the reason why I told you that one is because I think it's because I've been watching We Are the Champions recently on Netflix and there's a really good episode about chili eating and it is so good that I think it made me realize that I quite like spicy food. And you see people eating the hottest spices on the show. But anyway, that's why I told you that. Let me think of another one.

Joe Katz:
And you like it?

David Jonsson:
I really... yeah.

Joe Katz:
You love spicy?

David Jonsson:
Yeah, I grew up on it. I definitely grew up on it. So I do like it. I can definitely take some picante every now and again.

Joe Katz:
Like really strong?

David Jonsson:
No, not that strong, Joe. I mean, not that strong.

Joe Katz:
Oh, I'm pushing it.

David Jonsson:
You're pushing it, dude.

Joe Katz:
Darn. I was trying to make it more or something.

David Jonsson:
You're really getting me to the top.

Joe Katz:
Oh dear. Well, you just leave it spicy. Yes, yes, yes. Well, David, thank you so much. Everybody's got to tune into Industry. It's very... oh what should I say, fun, sexually charged at times, it's got a lot of spicy things. It's got a lot of spicy things. How about that?

David Jonsson:
It has.

Joe Katz:
Yes, yes, yes. Tune into that. There's a lot of great things and you'll have to come back on the next project you're working with and tell us more about that. So thanks so much for joining.

David Jonsson:
My pleasure.

Joe Katz:
And everybody can tune in or go to the YouTube and watch the video of David and I. Thanks a lot, David.

David Jonsson:
Thank you so much, Joe. Thank you.

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