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Lake Effect Films presents "The Unknown Tour"

Jimmy, Billy, Mike, Zach, and Chris set out to travel from LA to NYC, and back, recording musicians along the way. They were in search of the forgotten musicians, the buskers, the ones who put their hearts and souls into their songs. What they found were singers, songwriters, rappers, and musicians from all over the country with one common goal: MUSIC! This film will inspire you and awaken your inner musician. This is “The Unknown Tour.”

Cast of Characters:

Jimmy Jimes……….. Director

Billy Ferguson……… Cinematographer

Mike Jaeger………….Producer/Tour Manager

Chris Watson ……….Resident Songwriter/Music Consultant

Zack Djurich…………Music Producer



The Unknown Tour is distributed by Gravitas Ventures (gravitasventures.com).

You can watch the movie on Amazon and iTunes.

To learn more about the guys and the birth and transformation of Fannie visit http://www.lakeeffectfilms.com

*All music in this episode is from The Unknow Tour album

Intro Music:

(Singing).

Heather Grayson:

What happens when you take five guys, one RV converted tour bus, and musicians all over the country. One incredible documentary.

B.C. Wehman:

When Jimmy, Billy, Mike, Chris, and Zack got tired of making music videos for ungrateful stars, they knew there had to be more.

Heather Grayson:

They bought an RV, converted it to a tour bus and spent their summer traveling across the country in search of forgotten musicians scattered across the US.

B.C. Wehman:

Their goal? To create an album of songs, using the power of music to bring together singers and musicians that have never even met each other.

Heather Grayson:

They made the 10,000 mile journey from Los Angeles to New York City and back.

B.C. Wehman:

With stops along the way in cities, such as Santa Fe, New Orleans, St. Louis, and even Memphis, Tennessee.

Heather Grayson:

They recorded with people of all styles, ages, races, and instruments to create an album-

B.C. Wehman:

As inspirational as this film.

Heather Grayson:

Hi, I'm Heather Grayson: writer, producer, and director who craves passion in filmmaking. And documentarians are just that. I write fiction, but I love to watch the truth.

B.C. Wehman:

My name is B.C. Wehman. I'm an actor, a writer and entertainer, all sorts of creative endeavors. But what I love most? Being a storyteller. It's why I love documentaries. They're extraordinary stories from every day, extraordinary people. This is Behind the Doc.

Heather Grayson:

And today we are behind the scenes with the Unknown Tour.

Jimmy Jimes:

We were only two weeks into a trip that was supposed to last the whole summer. And we were already losing faith in our tour bus. We bought the bus from a stranger a few weeks before we left L.A. on a 10,000 mile journey to New York and back. There were five of us that quit our jobs and hit the road in search of the forgotten musicians scattered across the United States.

B.C. Wehman:

Today, we are going to talk to the fellows behind the Unknown Tour. There's a lot of questions we got to ask them, but we're very excited to get to meet Jimmy, Billy Mike, Chris, and Zack. But before we do that, why don't you guys go around the room, introduce yourselves, give us a super snippet of a bio and then we'll get going.

Billy Ferguson:

Hey, I'm Billy, I was the cinematographer on the Unknown Tour.

Mike Jaeger:

I am Mike and I was the tour manager.

Jimmy Jimes:

I'm Jimmy, I was the director.

Chris Watson:

I'm Chris, I was the resident songwriter.

Zack Djurich:

I'm Zack and I was the music producer.

Heather Grayson:

Wonderful. Thank you so much, gentlemen. And I wanted to ask this, the very first question, tell us how this whole adventure began.

Jimmy Jimes:

Billy and I were working at a production company in L.A. that did mostly music videos and little short behind the scenes videos for musicians. And typically they were sending us around the country to film with pretty big artists, people that were signed by labels. And there's a lot of behind the scenes .... People put a lot of effort into the way that they look, and they want to make sure their hair and makeup is done, and they want to make sure that everything about the narrative is perfect for these artists. These people really don't care about their music in the way that I know that people do care about music elsewhere.

Movie Clip:

The more I've learned about the music business, the more I've learned how different it is from the reason that we get into music. So many of us are independent. It's like we have to be our own business.

Jimmy Jimes:

And so we wanted to get to the heart of, how do we get deeper into real music, real songwriting that's really about something. It's not just made to resonate with the most people. And so we came up with this idea to quit our jobs and travel. And so we bought this bus. We just wanted to meet musicians and record them every single day, and that was our North star, was good music. And that led us around the country.

B.C. Wehman:

How did you end up deciding what your tour path was going to be, what cities you were actually going to visit?

Billy Ferguson:

A lot of people, when you think about the country as a whole, there are specific cities that stand out as music towns. That each have their own unique sound and genre of music that they cater to. So we chose the big ones, New Orleans, Nashville, New York, Detroit. All these cities that are famous for producing great music throughout our country's long history.

Jimmy Jimes:

And we would typically have three days in a city. So the first day we would go out and we would scout. And we would see there's a group of buskers in this area of New Orleans, or there's a bunch of bars in this area of New York, or whatever. And we would all kind of congregate there and see what we heard, and really follow our ears so to speak.

Mike Jaeger:

A really interesting thing too was we wound up in a lot of periphery cities that weren't necessarily where we thought we'd end up. When we're driving from New Orleans to Nashville, we found ourselves in Jackson, Mississippi. And cities like that were really incredible for finding musicians because people don't go there as much looking for music.

Zack Djurich:

I mean a lot of it was word of mouth too. Besides for just driving around a city or walking around in some of the main areas, people would submit friends and relatives to us or [Henny 00:00:05:48], for example, we got invited to a house party and she just happened to be there. We didn't know beforehand that there's going to be this musician that impacted the whole tour like she did.

Chris Watson:

And something that also was really incredible was once we would maybe get a recommendation to record another musician, then that would just lead us to somebody else in another city that we'd end up running into. And so it was kind of how we wanted to showcase how music was a collaborative effort and it's not a competition. It was just proven time and time again, that to create this album, we all had to collaborate from us working together. And then also the artists that we knew working together as well saying, "Hey, there's something really cool coming to town and you need to be a part of it".

B.C. Wehman:

So you went on tour, you traveled across the country, you literally made an album. Let's talk for a couple seconds, get into this nitty gritty of it, right. How does this work? You have a song writer, but you have songs and guitars and drums from all these cities. What is that process like? What starts first? Do you write the song? Do you write the guitar riff? Do you play the drums? Or do you just randomly select them and then you later audio engineer to put it all together? I mean, it's a pretty amazing process.

Jimmy Jimes:

So it is a very lengthy process. And we had whiteboards, the three windows of the bus we were using as whiteboards the entire time to try to keep track of the album as it was evolving. But generally the way that it would work is that there would be one person, usually a singer-songwriter, maybe there would be a voice and guitar. And they would play through three or four songs that they already had written. Or maybe they would just have a sketch of a song that they'd been working on and they would record that. And we would say, "Okay, cool. That's a good skeleton that I think we can build upon". And so let's say that that happened in Austin. And then from Austin, we'd go to New Orleans. And we would know that we had this sketch that we liked, that somebody had done in Austin.

Jimmy Jimes:

And then in New Orleans, we would have those recordings and we would add guitar, or add drums, or add bass to that song to build it into something that is more of a full sound. And then where it started to really get fun is that you would lay down drums. And with the rhythm section, a lot of times you could take drums that were recorded for one song and use them on another song if you sped them up a little bit digitally. Or when you start adding rap verses is where we would go totally off the rails.

Movie Clip:

(Singing).

Jimmy Jimes:

We probably recorded 10 or 15 rappers over the course of the journey. And we had two tempos that we were recording the rappers to. And so we knew, one of them was 92 and one was 140 BPM. And so we knew that if a singer-songwriter like played a song and it happened to fall in the 92 BPM range. We would know automatically, we have a rap verse that we can add to this song to make this more than what it is right now.

Jimmy Jimes:

And so it really was like a giant jigsaw puzzle where we're like left turns all the time from a country song. Oh, now there's a rap verse. Oh, this is like a singer-songwriter ballad. Oh, now here comes somebody with a drum solo. There's just wild moments all throughout it. That reflected how our days were laid out as well, because we would spend the first half of a day recording something really sleepy or really somber. And then we would go and we would record with HaSizzle in New Orleans. And he'd be screaming at the top of his lungs and playing bounce music. We wanted the album to reflect that experience as well.

Movie Clip:

(Singing).

Heather Grayson:

My question was that, do you regret any of this? Do you regret just throwing up your arms and saying, "I'm going to take this trip. I'm going to make this journey. I'm going to quit my job and I'm going to do this". Is there any kind of, "Oh, if I would've stayed in this, I could have been here". Or was this just absolutely 100% the best choice you made?

Zack Djurich:

Absolutely. For me, it was a blast. I mean, compared to what else I had going on at the time in Los Angeles as somewhat new, kind of trying to work my way up the ladder, as far as the music engineering and production thing went. And then I met these guys and it was like there's no choice.

Billy Ferguson:

Zack was the one who really took the most risk. The four of us, we all kind of knew each other and knew a little bit more what we were getting into. But Zack, we kind of put a call out for a music producer and Zack met us two times before the tour started.

Zack Djurich:

Yeah, for like a hour a piece maybe.

Billy Ferguson:

Yeah. So he really didn't know us as people. It was kind of blind faith for him to get on that bus and go.

B.C. Wehman:

How close were you just saying no, Zack, were you like 70/30, or were you all in from the get go?

Zack Djurich:

I mean, maybe I wasn't a hundred percent. But, I was super interested after I heard about the idea. Then I met up with all the guys and they were really excited about it. The bus was already finished by the time I got there. So I didn't have any work into that. By the time we hit the road, I was very convinced that this is what I should be doing.

Jimmy Jimes:

We learned a lot about the process of making and releasing an independent documentary. And I think that those are definitely hard lessons to learn. We had multiple experiences where people promised us funding and then it fell through, and we ended up self-funding our whole project here. What happened on this tour is stories that the five of us have been telling for the past two and a half years. And I'm sure that we don't understand that we're bragging when we tell these stories, but everybody knows that this was the coolest thing that any one of us have done.

Zack Djurich:

I think there's a huge mutual respect from all the artists we met too. That when they heard that part of our story, they were a lot more open to work with us because we're just normal people. It's not like we're traveling around with a network TV cast of people making a story.

B.C. Wehman:

Well, I think it shows clearly. And I think if you had had a lot of other voices in there, the final product is not going to be the same, your passion and sincerity between the five of you really shows, it really comes through the screen. But speaking of stories, one of my favorite stories, there's a lot of great cities featured in the film, but one of my favorites is New Orleans. Getting into the pride parade, which I heard you had to sneak your way into. So I'd like to hear about that.

Jimmy Jimes:

The parade was something that when we got to New Orleans, New Orleans has a ton of parades. It's a big parade town. But the biggest parade is the gay pride parade. And so when we arrived there, somebody was looking at a schedule of events in New Orleans for that weekend. And someone's like, "Oh, the pride parade's on Saturday". And so we all thought, "Ooh, I wonder, we have this big brightly colored bus. I wonder if we could get on the list to like be in this parade". And so we made a couple calls and the answer was no. But we figured we'll just drive there and show up anyway. And we'll see if we can grease our way in. And we were all really dressed to the nines for it. And we had a big group of people all having a dance party on the roof of the RV.

Jimmy Jimes:

And we were like, "All right, let's see if we can get into this actual parade". We were there an hour early. And so Mike and I walked over to the people who were wearing the bright yellow vests, the people in charge. And we just kind of try to talk our way in. I'll be honest. I kind of lied.

Mike Jaeger:

You lied to them.

Jimmy Jimes:

I was like, "We applied and we got approved, but we never got the paperwork". And this lady is looking at me like, "I don't think that you're telling the truth". But anyway, the lady was a little skeptical, but she could see our bus and she could see that we were like tailor-made for this parade. And I told her, "We came all the way from California for this". And so she went over and talked to some people in charge and she came back and she was like, "Look, this is what I'll do. I'm going to add you guys to the very last car of the parade. And so you guys will be the last one in the parade". And then that turned out to be that right behind us was a cop car, the whole parade. Which he kept telling us, "Stop standing on the roof of the bus. Quit jumping around, quit drinking on the roof of the bus". So we got in and that was a triumphant victory.

B.C. Wehman:

Well, I like how dressed to the nines is Mike on top of the bus with his pants hiked up so high that it looks like he was wearing an adult diaper, just chugging beers. It looked like a great time though Mike, you look like you're having a hell of a time.

Mike Jaeger:

It was a fantastic time. And I'm a lover of all human beings and support the cause. So got to show respect.

B.C. Wehman:

All right, well, let's dig into Henny. Tell us about Henny. Because she was a pretty cool find, and really with a great voice too.

Chris Watson:

There are so many people that invite us to all these things, but we got invited to a house party. And a good handful of performers that night, but it really was Henny when she took the stage, she just blew us all away immediately.

Movie Clip:

(Singing).

Jimmy Jimes:

She was only in New Orleans for a week to visit and then she had planned on going to New York.

Mike Jaeger:

She was traveling the US literally just doing open mics and singing and working on her craft. It meshed very well with what we were doing.

Chris Watson:

Because she was just going from show to show based on who she would meet and how that would go and the relationships that she built. And that's exactly what we were doing on the tour.

Mike Jaeger:

After we explained more to what we were doing, kind of showed her previous things we had done, she thought it was really cool. And then we were just like, "Do you want to come? You're going to New York anyway". And literally the next morning we picked her up and she had canceled her flight to New York City. And we had the sixth member of the crew.

Henny:

Super spontaneously you all came and I saw the big bus. And then I met you all in these shirts and I thought, hey are they playing soccer?

Jimmy Jimes:

But it was awesome when she was part of the tour. I mean she was in our bus for two weeks. And for those two weeks, we really connected with musicians even more. Because I mean we're five dudes from L.A. Henny being a singer-songwriter, a girl from Germany, having a totally different life experience. We recorded with a woman named Stephanie Bolton in Jackson, Mississippi.

Movie Clip:

(Singing).

Jimmy Jimes:

The bond between Henny and Stephanie was palpable. They really saw each other, respected each other in a way that two women can do and not necessarily a group of five guys. So it was awesome adding Henny to the journey, getting a little bit more diversity within our crew.

Heather Grayson:

Was there another artist that you just really connected with maybe individually, maybe as a group?

Jimmy Jimes:

I remember [Sunny 00:17:37] and [Fatie 00:17:37] really vividly. That was in Chicago. We met both of them in Chicago. Sunny is this five foot tall, small, kind of meek individual. And when she opened her mouth, it was so powerful. Her voice is a booming voice. And she wrote all of her own music.

Movie Clip:

(Singing).

Jimmy Jimes:

I felt the same way with Fatie. I mean Fatie when you hear her speak, you can tell she's going to have a beautiful singing voice. She has a really nice timbre to her voice. But she just stood on the lakefront in Chicago and belted out a song that immediately when hearing it in headphones while she was recording, I was like, "Ooh, this is like radio ready".

Movie Clip:

(Singing).

Chris Watson:

There was somebody else as well. When we were in Vancouver we didn't have any leads, so we went to an open mic and I played for a second. And then we met this guy. We didn't have time to stay, but this guy, Thunder. Just by his name, Thunder, we automatically knew he was going to be amazing.

Movie Clip:

(Singing).

Chris Watson:

It's kind of crazy. Because his story and all the things he had to say were just as good as his song and his performance and the way he would deliver songs.

Thunder:

You know, I grew up and there was a point in my life when I was homeless. We lived in a tent, we lived in a bus. People thought when we came to town that we were Ethiopian drug dealers, just because we were a big family. And through our music, people were able to see us differently.

Chris Watson:

He completely reimagined another song that we had on the tour. And just the way that he approached everything was just kind of, yeah music is really just about putting your own spin on things and just making it your own.

B.C. Wehman:

So you had five and then you got six with Henny. But what I need to know is about the seventh member.

Mike Jaeger:

The name of the bus is [Fannie 00:20:05]. You can call her Fannie because we treat her like a lady. Fannie is a 36 foot tour bus converted from an RV that we bought from an older gentlemen named Russ.

Chris Watson:

Fannie is extremely important to the tour. We work on Fannie. We sleep on Fannie. Sometimes we cook on Fannie.

B.C. Wehman:

Is Fannie still a bopping around Los Angeles right now?

Jimmy Jimes:

She's taking a rest right now. She's in a little RV storage place up North. We lived in Fannie for six months and it got spray painted in L.A., Which was very sad. And the mirror got shattered off the side of it. She's kind of in a little bit of disrepair right now.

B.C. Wehman:

I have four words for you. And just tell me the first things that come to your mind, Detroit Bureau of Sound. Go.

Mike Jaeger:

Cactus.

B.C. Wehman:

Does he have multiple cacti? Like water cups? He has different ones that make different pitches. Is that possible?

Jimmy Jimes:

I believe he only had one cactus.

Mike Jaeger:

Yeah he had one at the time, yeah.

Jimmy Jimes:

But we'll have to see. A little background there is we heard about this man, Zac. Cactus Zac, we call him. We heard about him because I had a friend who lived in Detroit and he texted me, "Oh my buddy, Zac has this group called Detroit Bureau of Sound and he plays a cactus". And in my mind, I'm expecting one thing, and we showed up and him playing the cactus was something totally different.

Cactus Zac:

The music that I make is oftentimes much more small.

Cactus Zac:

How am I making music that's the most interesting to the least amount of people? Rather than how I see pop music as how can it be the least interesting so that most people can project what they want onto it.

Jimmy Jimes:

It was hard not to laugh at first when Zac Bru started playing the cactus. It didn't sound anything like music, but the way he plucked the needles, the meticulous care he took in playing his instrument was impossible to forget.

Mike Jaeger:

And it was really cool because we didn't see anything like that. I don't know if anybody's ever seen anything like that before. So it was really interesting to just get a different perspective from, it kind of was a lot of like singer-songwriter. And then all of a sudden we're getting a cactus plucked for us which was awesome. It was just different.

Billy Ferguson:

Little background on Cactus Zac too, I still watch all of his stories on Instagram. And he's got a vast knowledge of classical music as well as electronic music. He's always posting actually very interesting stuff. So he's deeper than the cactus.

B.C. Wehman:

So you go across the country. One of the favorite things I love, because I'll do some, and Heather does too. We do some live performances and things. There is something about live performance that is [unreplica-hate-able 00:22:59], if that's such a word. And it's fun to imagine that you got to see these live performances of people who are, and if you've done an open mic, as some of us have, you're doing it for free, maybe three people and they are there every Tuesday or twice a week and just grinding at their craft. And I've took severe inspiration to get back off my keister and get grinding again, because these folks are out there grinding in hopes of something. And I think that was an amazing ... But just talk about seeing so many live performances. Because when you can feel it in your chest, it transcends even, I think a car or headphones, that kind of moment. So I can't imagine seeing hundreds of live performances.

Zack Djurich:

Yeah, it was definitely every day. I mean, outside of, whether it was on the street or in an actual venue, coffee shop, bar, it was definitely multiple times a day, every day. Prior to that, I had just been on Spotify constantly and that was one of my only ways of consuming music. So that was a huge change for me.

Billy Ferguson:

It takes a lot of guts to get on stage, especially by yourself with just a mic and a guitar. And for someone like myself who doesn't really play music, watching that day in and day out, I just had so much respect for all these men and women that we saw get up on stage and pour their hearts out.

Jimmy Jimes:

It's honestly, one of the reasons why it made so much sense to have Chris and the crew because the rest of us have maybe been on stage a few times in our lives to play or sing just a little bit. But Chris is a busker in L.A., and has been all over the world, and has played open mics and shows and is a stage performer. And so we wanted to have somebody on the bus that understands that world and understands what it's like to do it and to sort of bridge the gap between guys trying to make a movie about something and people that actually understand and do something. And so yeah, I mean we were seeing multiple performances a day, live performances. And watching people either crush or more often than not, people are kind of playing to a half empty room of people who don't care or buskers are oftentimes just playing to people that are walking by ignoring them. And that, I don't know who said it in the movie-

Billy Ferguson:

Hayward Williams from Milwaukee told us that he was playing live one time and people were throwing ice cubes at him.

Hayward Willaims:

It's long and hard and playing in bars and having people throw ice cubes at you and stuff like that.

Billy Ferguson:

Why would anyone do that? You got to be a real dick.

Jimmy Jimes:

I think of in Blues Brothers when they go and they play behind the chicken wire at the place and people are throwing glass bottles at them. I was always like, "Man, it's so hard to play live". People just don't want to like you always.

Heather Grayson:

Yeah, it caught my attention whenever, and I'm not sure who it was. But I believe he was from South America. But he said that, "People are sitting in their homes, in their living rooms getting famous and we're out here, and I've traveled to seven countries".

South American Singer:

Some people get famous on YouTube playing at home and we've been playing seven countries and nobody knows us.

Heather Grayson:

That is still happening. And the internet has not completely changed the world. What kind of reactions did your artists have when, with this gentlemen saying, "I've been all of these countries and I'm not famous". But, YouTube user whoever, they get all of this acclaim. What does that make you feel like? And what do you want to provide to them?

Mike Jaeger:

Well, there was a part in the movie in Jackson when we were with Stephanie Bolton, who is amazing. And she said to us, she said-

Stephanie Bolton:

Record labels just pay A&R people to go out, travel, find artists. They cut that out. This tour you all are going out to open the door so we can walk through and you can see it.

Mike Jaeger:

She said that doesn't exist anymore. And we were the first people to actually come and physically meet her, and see her, and film and record with her. And she just was like, "That's a total lost art in the digital and video age". So it was cool to get our feet on the ground and make people excited about playing music for somebody again.

Jimmy Jimes:

This movie is sort of taking it back a couple of decades, I think. And what we got is something that reflects that. It's a lot of people that are still writing music, that's actually about their own life. And actually putting time into packing up their gear and going to a venue to play instead of just playing on Instagram.

Billy Ferguson:

I think you mentioned the type of feeling you get when you watch someone play music live is, that's different than it is to experience that music through your headphones on Spotify or Instagram. Social media has really changed the way we experience music. And I don't know if it's necessarily positive or negative, but I do know that you lose out on that feeling when you aren't experiencing it live and in person.

B.C. Wehman:

I think what happens with A&R folks like that then is you tend to see how the music resonates for you individually. You kind of have this introverted way of listening versus what live music is, is how it resonates with people, right. And how it affects more than you. And I think that's what they need to do. And what they're doing now is essentially swiping right for success, right? I mean, that's what they're going ... And you had a great part where everyone talked about success and what it meant to them, because for some people it's winning a Grammy and for someone it's just getting 25 bucks at the end of the night. Someone to finally pay them for their hard work. So what was that like in hearing everyone's version of success and how has it defined, I guess your version of success now that you've made a movie, put out an album and are now working the awesome interview circuit?

Mike Jaeger:

Well, this is the best interview we've had so far. By far the best podcast, yeah.

Billy Ferguson:

Yeah best podcast interview for sure. And yeah, I feel within this moment, talking to you guys and hearing all the kind words you guys have to say about the project, that is success enough for me as a filmmaker who just wants his movie to be seen. So I appreciate that, but I'm sure that you guys have different versions of it.

Jimmy Jimes:

When we put the movie out, the weekend that it came out in November, and everybody was pre-ordering it or watching it or whatever. I forget which one, I think the weekend that people were able to actually watch it. And people were sending me Instagram DM's, if I'm being honest. People were Instagram DM'ing me and being like, "Yo, I just watched the movie. This thing's incredible. I had kept up with the tour, but it's crazy to see what it finally became". Those moments are definitely the moments that felt very successful to me.

Chris Watson:

I think in essence we all seek to inspire. And to have so many people just be inspired. There were so many people that were like, "Yo, I just saw the tour. I'm picking up the drums again". "Yo, I just saw the tour. You told me to play the trumpet, I'm going back". And just even inspiring you guys, and just everything. And we sought to inspire and we did inspire.

Mike Jaeger:

There was a really cool moment. I had the privilege of showing it in a really cool old theater in my hometown in Wisconsin. My parents were super supportive just in general. I had a, whatever, for lack of a better term, a good job. And I call them and tell them, "Hey, I'm quitting. I just got a promotion, but I'm quitting. And I'm going to go on the road and make this film". And they were like, "Cool. Do it".

Mike Jaeger:

And so that, just super helpful. And when the movie finally came out, they rented a theater and invited everybody they knew. And they put out like flyers. And people I didn't even know, probably a hundred people came out and got to watch it on the big screen. And I don't really want to be the center of attention or anything, but everybody, all these people from kids to elderly people were coming up to me and saying it was great. And whatever their opinion of it is fine, but it was really cool to just create something for people to see, I guess. And have any sort of feeling about it.

B.C. Wehman:

What was the reaction like from some of these singers and songwriters and musicians when they finally heard the finished product? Because you were saying, "Hey, play this drum line", but it could be months until they hear it. What were some of the reactions to some of the folks hearing their songs, and then has any of these people that are on these songs called each other up and been like, "Hey, we sound fantastic together. We should start a band"?

Jimmy Jimes:

There was a huge amount of love out poured onto us by the musicians involved. I mean, frankly, I think that Zack is the best producer that many of these musicians have ever worked with. And I worked closely with Zack to this whole project. And I can say with total sincerity, him recording and mixing and producing these artists' voices was the biggest gift that we could give any of these artists. I mean people were super positive and loved when they heard their voice on the albums.

Zack Djurich:

My side of the story is I'm just so happy that it all worked because none of us really knew that it was going to turn out great at the end of this.

Heather Grayson:

Now with your album, which I enjoyed immensely and B.C. did as well. What is your favorite song? Mine personally was Wonder.

Movie Clip:

(Singing).

Chris Watson:

I think I got to go with Over.

Movie Clip:

(Singing).

Chris Watson:

Yeah, I think Over is my favorite song. It's just so good.

Mike Jaeger:

I like a NYC with my guy Lavonne AKA Journey. He's been my buddy for a while.

Movie Clip:

(Singing).

B.C. Wehman:

I'm team NYC as well.

Jimmy Jimes:

We took a sample that was recorded in Washington Square Park in New York. There was a little jazz trio playing and we used the jazz song they were playing as a sample to create a rap beat that then a rapper in L.A., a rapper in New York, and then a singer in Portland all collaborated on, and a singer in Seattle. So that was one of the ones, that song really made the journey from coast to coast. And it's got a great vibe.

Heather Grayson:

Well, I just want to say that this is much more than an album for me, much more than a movie. It was definitely something that got me thinking about my next projects. And I want to thank you so much for talking to us today. Thank you all, giving us your time, your effort, your input.

B.C. Wehman:

That is awesome. Thank you gentlemen. Once again, the Unknown Tour, their road trip is better than your road trip because they made a freaking album. So excellent gentlemen, thank you very much for your time and good luck out there.

Jimmy Jimes:

Thanks for having us.

Movie Clip:

I want to write music that's impactful and touches people. If I can carry a message that's going to last for tomorrow and ongoing. I want to change this world into a better place with positive music. Inspire new people to appreciate the music so that the music could perpetuate. That's the essence of success right there, carries on forever, timeless.

B.C. Wehman:

Behind the Doc is produced by Evergreen Podcast in association with Gravitas Ventures. Special thanks to executive producers, Nolan, Gallagher, and Michael DeAloia. Produced by Sarah Willgrube and audio engineer, Eric Koltnow. And you'll find us everywhere and anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts.

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